A Year of Alphabet: Great for Google, Less So for Moonshots

Reorganizing itself under the umbrella company Alphabet has done wonders for Google — but less so for a grab bag of eclectic projects ranging from robotic cars to internet-beaming balloons, which are suffering costly growing pains.

A year after Alphabet took shape, Google’s revenue growth has accelerated — an unusual development for a company of its size. That success, however, also underscores Alphabet’s dependence on the fickle business of placing digital ads in core Google products like search, Gmail and YouTube video. As a result, it remains vulnerable to swings in marketing budgets and stiffening competition from another equally ambitious rival, Facebook.

Alphabet was supposed to speed the process of turning offshoot businesses into new technological jackpots. CEO Larry Page predicted that separating these smaller “moonshots” from the massive search-and-advertising business would spur innovation by fostering a more entrepreneurial atmosphere.

That hasn’t happened during Alphabet’s first year.

MAKING THE SHIFT

Until Page and fellow Google co-founder Sergey Brin created Alphabet (which turns 1 on Sunday), investors complained that Google was spending too much on high-risk efforts. New Chief Financial Officer Ruth Porat, who joined Google in mid-2015, responded by reining in expenses to keep them more in line with revenue growth.

A few months later, Page announced the plan to draw a dividing line between Google and the far-flung forays Alphabet now refers to as “Other Bets.” The mishmash includes smart-thermostat maker Nest; the Fiber project, a high-speed internet service; and X lab, where the company is building robotic cars and designing the stratospheric balloons designed to beam internet service to remote areas.

Other “Other Bets” include the biotech firm Verily and medical-research firm Calico, which has been studying ways to stop aging. Alphabet also runs funds investing in startups and mid-sized companies.

Page argued that fencing off Other Bets would make Google “even better through greater focus.”

CORE SUCCESSES

That part of Page’s vision appears to be panning out. After subtracting ad commissions, Alphabet’s second-quarter revenue jumped 22 percent from the previous year to $17.5 billion. It was the best performance in four years, adjusted for changes in currency exchange rates, says RBC analyst Mark Mahaney. Alphabet shares rose 25 percent over the past year, easily outpacing major market indexes.

“Folks will be hard pressed to say that Alphabet hasn’t been a success,” SP Global Market Intelligence analyst Scott Kessler says.

Alphabet Inc. declined to comment on its first-year performance. But Sundar Pichai, who became Google’s CEO in the restructuring, told investors in July, “There is an amazing energy right now.”

Among other things, Google has been making strides in the still-nascent field of artificial intelligence, hoping to create more convenient services that attract even more eyeballs for its advertisers.

STALLED BETS

But the demand for financial discipline and accountability appears to have taken a toll on Other Bets, which lose billions of dollars a year. Key leaders have defected from Alphabet’s high-profile self-driving car project and its Nest line of internet-connected devices. Alphabet also has scaled back plans to expand its Fiber service to dozens of U.S. cities.

Creating a holding company also was supposed to make it easier to diversify through major acquisitions. But Alphabet’s biggest deal so far has been the $625 million purchase of a business software maker, Apigee Corp., which had annual revenue of just $92 million.

Alphabet could make a much bigger splash if buys Twitter, as recent reports say it is considering. Twitter would give Alphabet a popular publishing outlet to monitor trends, mine data and sell even more ads. Alphabet declined to discuss whether it’s mulling a bid, which would be expensive; Twitter might fetch between $20 and $30 billion, despite its problems with user growth and online harassment.

LOOKING BEYOND

Google is doing so well that investors aren’t fixating on the losses with Other Bets, Kessler says.

Only three Bets — Nest, Fiber and Verily — are generating even a smidgen of revenue. In nine months, the Other Bets companies have lost a combined $2.6 billion on revenue of $410 million. Another big loss is expected in the July-September quarter; the company reports results on Oct. 27.

BGC analyst Colin Gillis still sees the gamble as prudent and expects at least one of the projects will come up with a breakthrough that lessens Alphabet’s dependence on Google.

Optimism is fine as Google keeps growing at a robust rate. But Wall Street will likely ratchet up the pressure if the company falters and nothing emerges from Other Bets to help pick up the slack.

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This story has been corrected to change spelling of first reference to a biotech firm to Verily instead of Verify.

Article source: http://abcnews.go.com/Technology/wireStory/year-alphabet-great-google-moonshots-42485174

Feds List 7 Hawaii Bee Species as Endangered, a First in US

Federal authorities on Friday added seven yellow-faced bee species, Hawaii’s only native bees, for protection under the Endangered Species Act, a first for any bees in the United States.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced the listing after years of study by the conservation group Xerces Society, state government officials and independent researchers. The Xerces Society says its goal is to protect nature’s pollinators and invertebrates, which play a vital role in the health of the overall ecosystem.

The nonprofit organization was involved in the initial petitions to protect the bee species, said Sarina Jepson, director of endangered species and aquatic programs for the Portland, Oregon-based group.

Jepson said yellow-faced bees can be found elsewhere in the world, but these particular species are native only to Hawaii and pollinate plant species indigenous to the islands.

The bees face a variety of threats including “feral pigs, invasive ants, loss of native habitat due to invasive plants, fire, as well as development, especially in some for the coastal areas,” Jepson told The Associated Press.

The bees can be found in a wide variety of habitats in Hawaii, from coastal environments to high-elevation shrub lands, she said. The yellow-faced bees pollinate some of Hawaii’s endangered native plant species. While other bees could potentially pollinate those species, many could become extinct if these bees were to die off entirely.

Hawaii-based entomologist Karl Magnacca worked with Xerces on much of the initial research. It has taken almost 10 years to get to this point, he told the AP. “It’s good to see it to finally come to fruition,” he said.

The bees “tend to favor the more dominant trees and shrubs we have here,” he said. “People tend to focus on the rare plants, and those are important, that’s a big part of the diversity. But the other side is maintaining the common ones as common. (The bees) help maintain the structure of the whole forest.”

Magnacca added that there are a lot more rare insects that deserve protection. “It may not necessarily be appropriate to list them as endangered, but we have this huge diversity that we need to work on and protect here in Hawaii,” he said. “There’s a huge amount of work that needs to be done.”

The bees are critical for maintaining the health of plants and other animals across the islands, said Gregory Koob, conservation and restoration team manager for the Fish and Wildlife Service in Honolulu.

There is no designated critical habitat attached to the listing, he said, but the protection will allow authorities to implement recovery programs, access funding and limit their harm from outside sources. All federal agencies must consult with the Fish and Wildlife service when interacting with endangered species.

“As an animal, it can’t be taken or harmed or killed by individuals,” Koob said. “Any research that is done needs a permit from Fish and Wildlife Service unless it’s done by a state agency.”

Koob said that if the bees were removed from ecosystem, the plants that they pollinate would likely not survive.

“Those plants are not only food and nesting habitat for the bees, but they also provide habitat for other animals,” he said. “It’s the web of life.”

Friday’s listing finalized the protection of 10 animal species in Hawaii, the seven bees along with the band-rumped storm-petrel, the orangeblack Hawaiian damselfly and the anchialine pool shrimp. It also added 39 species of plants native to Hawaii.

The rusty-patched bumble bee, found widely across the continental United States, is also being considered for protection.

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Find more stories by AP’s Caleb Jones at http://bigstory.ap.org/journalist/caleb-jones Follow Jones on Twitter: https://twitter.com/CalebAP

Article source: http://abcnews.go.com/Technology/wireStory/feds-list-hawaii-bee-species-endangered-us-42485924

Reptile With ‘Bizarre’ Limbs Tweaks Current Understanding of Evolution

A new study on 212-million-year-old fossils from an extinct reptile with strange arms has shed new light on our understanding of evolution.

A team of scientists analyzed the fossils of a drepanosaurus, a prehistoric reptile that has been described as a “chameleon-anteater hybrid,” and found that the bone structure, especially in the front limbs, were unlike any other animals from that time period.

“This animal stretches the bounds of what we think can evolve in the limbs of four-footed animals,” Adam Pritchard, the lead author on the paper and a postdoctoral researcher at Yale University, said in a statement.

Pritchard, Alan Turner of Stony Brook University, Randall Irmis of the University of Utah, Sterling Nesbitt of Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, and Nathan Smith of the Dinosaur Institute at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles co-authored the report and published their findings on Thursday in the journal Current Biology.

The fossils indicated that the animal’s two arm bones, the radius and ulna, are different sizes, unlike most tetrapods (a general term for four-limbed animals).

“Ecologically, Drepanosaurus seems to be a sort of chameleon-anteater hybrid, which is really bizarre for the time. It possesses a totally unique forelimb,” Pritchard added.

The team of scientists also wrote that these unusual front arms are significant because the “structural relationships between the bones of the forelimb have remained largely unchanged throughout the 375 million year history of Tetrapoda.”

The drepanosaurus also has an unusually long claw on one of its fingers.

The presence of a claw is also unique, according to the paper, because it “demonstrates that specialized, modern ecological roles had developed during the Triassic Period, over 200 million years ago.”

The drepanosaurus fossils were discovered in Ghost Ranch, New Mexico, according to the report.

Article source: http://abcnews.go.com/Technology/reptile-bizarre-front-limbs-tweaks-current-understanding-evolution/story?id=42483871

Scientists: World Likely Won’t Avoid Dangerous Warming Mark

A team of top scientists is telling world leaders to stop congratulating themselves on the Paris agreement to fight climate change because if more isn’t done, global temperatures will likely hit dangerous warming levels in about 35 years.

Six scientists who were leaders in past international climate conferences joined with the Universal Ecological Fund in Argentina to release a brief report Thursday, saying that if even more cuts in heat-trapping gases aren’t agreed upon soon, the world will warm by another 1.8 degrees Fahrenheit (1 degree Celsius) by around 2050.

That 1.8 degree mark is key because in 2009 world leaders agreed that they wanted to avoid warming of 2 degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit) above pre-industrial levels. Temperatures have already risen about 1 degree Celsius (1.8 degrees Fahrenheit), so that 2 degree goal is really about preventing a rise of another degree going forward.

Examining the carbon pollution cuts and curbs promised by 190 nations in an agreement made in Paris last December, the scientists said it’s simply not enough.

“The pledges are not going to get even close,” said report lead author Sir Robert Watson, a University of East Anglia professor and former World Bank chief scientist who used to be chairman of the United Nations‘ Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. “If you governments of the world are really serious, you’re going to have to do way, way more.”

If carbon pollution continues with just the emission cuts pledged in Paris, Earth will likely hit the danger mark by 2050, Watson and colleagues calculated, echoing what other researchers have found. They said with just a few more cuts, the danger level might be delayed by 20 years,

In Paris, the countries also added a secondary tougher goal of limiting warming to just another 0.9 degrees Fahrenheit (half a degree Celsius) as an aspiration.

There “is no hope of us stabilizing” at that temperature because the carbon dioxide in the atmosphere already commits the world to hitting that mark, Watson said.

Watson said a few weeks ago he was in Washington at an event with United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki Moon and former Vice President Al Gore celebrating the accord as a victory.

“It struck me that this was naive,” Watson said. “This is a real major challenge to stay even close to 2 degrees Celsius.”

That 2-degree danger mark is on a continuum with harmful effects already being felt now at lower warming levels, Watson said. But he added: “As you go more and more above 2, the negative effects become more and more pronounced, more and more severe.”

The report wasn’t published in a scientific journal. Six outside scientists looked at for The Associated Press and said the science behind it was sound and so were the conclusions.

“It is a good summary of what is common knowledge in the climate expert community but not widely appreciated by members of the public and even policy makers,” said Stefan Rahmstorf, head of Earth system analysis at the Potsdam Institute in Germany. “So indeed it is a useful reminder notice to the world about what is at stake.”

On Tuesday, scientists at Climate Interactive In Asheville, North Carolina, who weren’t part of the report ran a computer simulation using pledges from the Paris agreement and found that dangerous mark arrives around 2051, said group co-director Drew Jones.

Article source: http://abcnews.go.com/Technology/wireStory/scientists-world-avoid-dangerous-warming-mark-42450463

Tesla on Autopilot and Bus Collide in Germany

Police in northern Germany say a Tesla being driven with its Autopilot system engaged collided with a bus on a highway.

But Tesla says the Autopilot was not at fault.

Ratzeburg police say that the crash happened Wednesday afternoon on a stretch of autobahn about 50 kilometers (30 miles) east of Hamburg. The Tesla driver was slightly injured.

Police said in a statement Thursday that the 50-year-old Tesla driver told officers he had used the Autopilot. It wasn’t immediately clear whether police had themselves confirmed the Autopilot’s use, and calls to the Ratzeburg police precinct weren’t answered late Thursday.

A Tesla spokeswoman in Palo Alto, California, said Thursday the Autopilot system was on and functioned properly in the incident, based on conversations the company had with the driver and authorities.

The system could not have prevented the crash because the bus swerved into the Tesla driver’s lane while the Tesla was next to the bus, the company said.

Tesla updated the Autopilot software this month following a deadly crash in May. In that crash, a driver using the system was killed when his Model S sedan struck a tractor-trailer in Florida.

Article source: http://abcnews.go.com/Technology/wireStory/tesla-rear-ends-bus-germany-driver-blames-autopilot-42448637

Warm Pacific Ocean ‘Blob’ Facilitated Vast Toxic Algae Bloom

A new study finds that unusually warm Pacific Ocean temperatures helped cause a massive bloom of toxic algae last year that closed lucrative fisheries from California to British Columbia and disrupted marine life from seabirds to sea lions.

Scientists linked the large patch of warm ocean water, nicknamed the “blob,” to the vast ribbon of toxic algae that flourished in 2015 and produced record-breaking levels of a neurotoxin that is harmful to people, fish and marine life.

The outbreak of the toxin domoic acid, the largest ever recorded on the West Coast, closed razor clam seasons in Washington and Oregon and delayed lucrative Dungeness crab fisheries along the coast. High levels were also detected in many stranded marine mammals.

“We’re not surprised now having looked at the data, but our study is the first to demonstrate that linkage,” said Ryan McCabe, lead author and a research scientist at the University of Washington’s Joint Institute for the Study of the Atmosphere and Ocean. “It’s the first question that everyone was asking.”

McCabe and his co-authors explain how the toxic algae bloom thrived in their study published in the journal Geophysical Research Letters.

Seasonal algae blooms are common each year along the West Coast, but most are not toxic. The scientists found that the algae bloom was dominated by a single species called “Pseudo-nitzschia australis” that is highly toxic.

The algae survived and took advantage of warm, nutrient-poor conditions set up by the patch of water that was warmer at the surface than normal.

Coastal upwelling last spring — a seasonal event that brings nutrient-rich, cooler waters up from the deep ocean — provided nutrients for the algae to bloom into a large population fairly quickly at sea. Finally, a series of late spring storms delivered the bloom to the coast.

“While temperature isn’t everything, it’s serving as a decent proxy,” said McCabe. “We think there’s a linkage between toxic events along our coast and climate variability indices.”

The blob was a one-time event that was not due to global warming, “but we are looking at this event as a potential window into the future as what conditions could look like,” McCabe said.

Kathi Lefebvre, a co-author and marine biologist at NOAA’s Northwest Fisheries Science Center, said the bloom resulted in the highest levels of domoic acid contamination in the food web ever recorded for many species.

Domoic acid accumulates in anchovies, sardines and other small fish as well as shellfish that eat the algae.

Marine mammals and fish-eating birds in turn can get sick from eating the contaminated fish. In people, it can trigger amnesic shellfish poisoning, which can cause permanent loss of short-term memory in severe cases.

Sea lions in California commonly experienced seizures, a common sign of domoic acid poisoning, during harmful algae blooms along that state’s coast. But 2015 was the first year that such harmful effects were documented as far north as Washington state, scientists said.

“This is an eye-opener for what the future may hold as ocean conditions continue to warm globally,” Lefebvre said.

Article source: http://abcnews.go.com/Technology/wireStory/warm-pacific-ocean-blob-facilitated-vast-toxic-algae-42462229

VW Chief: Working on Settlement With US for Emissions Fraud

Volkswagen CEO Matthias Mueller says the company is cooperating with U.S. authorities and hopes to reach a settlement on a fine with the Justice Department for equipping diesel vehicles to cheat on emissions tests.

Mueller said the company admits it “made a big mistake” and that “we have worked on a very cooperative basis with the authorities in Germany, Europe, and the U.S. and we hope, especially in the United States, the results of the investigation are pronounced by the Justice Department with a settlement and a corresponding fine.”

Mueller told The Associated Press on Wednesday that possible fines reported in different news media were “pure speculation.”

Asked if a fine could threaten the company’s credit rating or financial solidity, he said Volkswagen was a “financially very robust organziation” but added that “I can only answer that question when I know the amount of the fine.”

Volkswagen has admitted wrongdoing in equipping cars with software to evade emissions testing and has agreed on a $15 billion civil settlement with environmental authorities, state governments and vehicle owners in a federal court in San Francisco. The deal, which still has to be approved by a federal judge, requires the company to spend up to $10 billion buying back or fixing about 475,000 2-liter diesel vehicles involved in the scandal and paying owners an additional $5,100 to $10,000 each.

One Volkswagen engineer has pleaded guilty to federal criminal charges in the United States and agreed to cooperate with federal authorities in the investigation. Volkswagen has brought in a law firm to conduct its own probe. Mueller said the Jones Day law firm had put 13 million documents in a database made available to the Department of Justice and that “they will certainly identify the people who were involved.”

Volkswagen showed off a new electric drive small car at the Paris auto show, part of the company’s effort to emphasize low-emissions vehicles and its embracing of new technology and ways of doing business, including autonomous driving, car-sharing and ride-sharing.

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AP Business Writer Tom Krisher contributed to this report from Detroit.

Article source: http://abcnews.go.com/Technology/wireStory/vw-chief-working-settlement-us-emissions-fraud-42423535

Apple Partners With Deloitte in Pitch to Business

Apple is extending its push into selling business technology by forging a partnership with the Deloitte consulting firm to advise companies on using iPhones, iPads and Apple software in the workplace.

While Apple primarily sells to the consumer market, it’s confronting a global slowdown in consumer demand for smartphones and tablets. That’s spurred the Cupertino, California, tech giant to announce business-focused partnerships with companies that sell technology to corporate customers. These include IBM, SAP and Cisco.

Apple says it sold $25 billion worth of products and services to businesses in the 12 months through September 2015. That was a 40 percent increase, but just a slice of its $233 billion in total sales. CEO Tim Cook told The Associated Press that Apple will soon announce figures that show more growth. Apple reports its quarterly earnings on Oct. 27.

“It’s a healthy number and it’s an incredibly great growth rate,” he said.

Analysts say businesses are using more Apple devices after years of relying on computers running Microsoft programs like Windows, Office and Exchange. As mobile devices have become more popular, some companies found gadgets running Google’s Android software to be cheaper and easily adapted to run specialized apps.

Many businesses started accommodating Apple devices, however, after employees started bringing them to work. Deloitte CEO Punit Renjen said companies like Apple devices for their ease of use and designs that emphasize data security.

Apple has also promoted its latest tablet, the iPad Pro, as a device that’s well-suited for work because of its larger screen and accessories like a physical keyboard and stylus.

Deloitte’s 244,000 workers are currently using about 100,000 Apple devices, many of them running custom software apps, Renjen said. Deloitte has created a team of 5,000 consultants to advise corporate clients on how to deploy Apple devices for specialized business tasks, such as insurance claims adjusting or retail sales, and building software apps for their business.

Article source: http://abcnews.go.com/Technology/wireStory/apple-partners-deloitte-pitch-business-42423435

HP Promises Fix for Printer Software That Barred Outside Ink

HP Inc. has apologized to customers for a software update that made some of its printers stop working with ink cartridges from competing suppliers, even if the printers had accepted the same cartridges in the past.

The apology comes after critics complained HP had over-reached by interfering with its customers’ right to choose ink suppliers. Critics also warned it could make customers less likely to accept future software updates, leaving their printers vulnerable to hackers or malware.

HP says the update was part of a long-standing effort to protect customers from using counterfeit or “unauthorized” cartridges. But in a statement Wednesday, HP apologized to customers for not explaining what it was doing, and promised another software update that provides the option of reversing the controversial change.

“Although only a small number of customers have been affected, one customer who has a poor experience is one too many,” said the statement, signed by Jon Flaxman, HP’s chief operating officer.

Printer ink is one of HP’s most profitable products, and the company has long tried to discourage customers from using lower-priced ink from other suppliers. It argues that unauthorized ink cartridges infringe on HP’s patented technology and may provide poor quality printing.

HP places security chips on its own cartridges so they can be recognized by its printers, which display a notification when a cartridge isn’t approved by HP. Earlier this year, the company delivered an online software update for some inkjet printers that included a new security feature that stopped printers from working with unauthorized cartridges that HP says contain “cloned” security chips — even if the printers had accepted those cartridges before.

The update sparked customer complaints and condemnation from the Electronic Frontier Foundation, which advocates for tech users’ rights.

In an open letter, EFF’s Cory Doctorow called the update a “bait-and-switch” tactic that deprived consumers of choice and made their printers less useful. He also warned the move would make consumers less willing to accept future updates that could address more serious security problems.

“Customers need to feel confident that they can accept security updates without compromising basic functionality,” Doctorow wrote.

Flaxman said HP will continue to use authentication measures to protect its intellectual property “and the quality of our customer experience.” But he wrote, “We should have done a better job of communicating about the authentication procedure to customers, and we apologize.”

Article source: http://abcnews.go.com/Technology/wireStory/hp-promises-fix-printer-software-barred-ink-42430919

Password Breach Could Have Ripple Effects Well Beyond Yahoo

As investors and investigators weigh the damage of Yahoo’s massive breach to the internet icon, information security experts worry that the record-breaking haul of password data could be used to open locks up and down the web.

While it’s unknown to what extent the stolen data has been or will be circulating — or how easy it would be to use if it were — giant breaches can send ripples of insecurity across the internet.

“Data breaches on the scale of Yahoo are the security equivalent of ecological disasters,” said Matt Blaze, a security researcher who directs the Distributed Systems Lab at the University of Pennsylvania, in a message posted to Twitter .

A big worry is a cybercriminal technique known as “credential stuffing,” which works by throwing leaked username and password combinations at a series of websites in an effort to break in, a bit like a thief finding a ring of keys in an apartment lobby and trying them, one after the other, in every door in the building. Software makes the trial-and-error process practically instantaneous.

Credential stuffing typically succeeds between 0.1 percent and 2 percent of the time, according to Shuman Ghosemajumder, the chief technology officer of Mountain View, California-based Shape Security. That means cybercriminals wielding 500 million passwords could conceivably hijack tens of thousands of other accounts.

“It becomes a numbers game for them,” Ghosemajumder said in a telephone interview.

So will the big Yahoo breach mean an explosion of smaller breaches elsewhere, like the aftershocks that follow a big quake?

That seems unlikely given that Yahoo says the “vast majority” of its passwords were stored in an encrypted form believed to be difficult to unscramble. On the other hand, Yahoo said the theft occurred in late 2014, meaning that hackers have had as many as two years to try to decipher the data.

Ghosemajumder said he didn’t see a surge in new breaches so much as a steady increase in attempts as cybercriminals replenish their stock of freshly hacked passwords.

The first hint that something was wrong at Yahoo came when Motherboard journalist Joseph Cox started receiving supposed samples of credentials hacked from the company in early July. Several weeks later, a cybercriminal using the handle “Peace” came forward with 5,000 samples — and the startling claim to be selling 200 million more.

On Aug. 1 Cox published a story on the sale , but the journalist said he never established with any certainty where Peace’s credentials came from. He noted that Yahoo said most of its passwords were secured with one encryption protocol, while Peace’s sample used a second. Either Peace drew his sample from a minority of Yahoo data or he was dealing with a different set of data altogether.

“With the information available at the moment, it’s more likely to be the latter,” Cox said in an email Tuesday.

The Associated Press has been unable to locate Peace. The darknet market where the seller has been active in the past has been inaccessible for days, purportedly due to cyberattacks.

At the moment it’s not known who holds the passwords or whether a state-sponsored actor, which Yahoo has blamed for the breach, would ever have an interest in passing its data to people like Peace .

Even if the hack was a straightforward espionage operation, Gartner security analyst Avivah Litan said that wouldn’t be a reason to relax. Spies can mine trivial-seeming data from apparently random citizens to tease out their real targets’ secrets.

“That’s how intelligence works,” Litan said in a phone call.

Meanwhile Yahoo users who recycle the same password across the internet may still be at risk. While people can always change the passwords across all the sites they use, Yahoo’s announcement that some security questions were compromised too means that the risks associated with the breach are likely to linger.

A password can be changed, after all, but how do you reset your mother’s maiden name?

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Online:

Raphael Satter can be reached at: http://raphaelsatter.com

Article source: http://abcnews.go.com/Technology/wireStory/password-breach-ripple-effects-yahoo-42385949